Posts

Learn the difference between skills development and training in manufacturing, how they are important, and how the management of them can be improved through continuous learning methodologies and emerging technology.

At first glance, training and skills development seem synonymous and are often used interchangeably, but they have different purposes and goals. However, despite these differences, both are equally important for every organization, especially in the case of the manufacturing industry. According to Training Magazine, 57% of manufacturing organizations reported training and workforce development budget increases to address the widening skills gap and the skilled labor shortage.

the difference between skills development and training in manufacturing

At the most basic level, training is the process companies use to build the skills of new employees so they’re well-equipped to perform the role that they were hired for. While skills development, on the other hand, includes ongoing education, mentoring, and professional experiences that help employees grow into future roles and opportunities.

Both are extremely valuable to overall organizational growth and success, however, it’s important to apply them at the right time and in the right way. Read more on both skills development and training in manufacturing, why they are important, and how they can be improved and enhanced through the proper application of learning technology:

What is Skills Development in Manufacturing

Skills development goes beyond training by aiming to enhance a broader set of competencies and capabilities. It focuses on building a more well-rounded and adaptable workforce encompassing not only the acquisition of specific skills, but also the improvement of problem-solving abilities, critical thinking, creativity, adaptability, and continuous learning.

Skills development in manufacturing refers to the process of enhancing the knowledge, abilities, and competencies of individuals involved in the manufacturing process. It involves providing training and education to workers, engineers, and technicians to improve their technical, operational, and problem-solving skills. By providing training and development opportunities, manufacturing organizations can ensure that their workforce possesses the necessary skills and knowledge to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently.

skills management and training software for manufacturing

Many manufacturing industries face a shortage of skilled workers. Skills development programs help bridge the gap by training existing employees or new hires in the required competencies.

Overall, skills development in manufacturing is crucial for maintaining competitiveness in a rapidly changing industry. It ensures that the workforce remains adaptable, skilled, and capable of meeting the evolving demands of modern manufacturing processes.

Pro Tip

Implementing skills management software programs allow manufacturing organizations to digitize and effectively track worker skills, development progress, and intelligently assign work based on skills competencies, improving work allocation and workforce utilization.

A

What is Training in Manufacturing

Training in manufacturing primarily focuses on imparting specific knowledge, skills, or information to individuals. It often involves structured and organized programs designed to teach employees how to perform specific tasks or operate machinery and equipment. Training is often of shorter duration and may be task-specific or role-specific. It is designed to quickly bring employees up to a certain proficiency level in their current job.

The specific type of training required in manufacturing depends on the roles and responsibilities of the individuals involved, the company’s processes, and the industry in which they operate. Training in manufacturing is essential for several reasons:

  • Safety: Manufacturing processes often involve machinery, equipment, and materials that can be hazardous. Proper training ensures that employees understand and follow safety protocols, reducing the risk of accidents and injuries.
  • Quality Control: Quality in manufacturing is a critical, essential factor. Training programs teach employees how to maintain consistent product quality through accurate measurements, inspections, and adherence to quality standards.
  • Operational Efficiency: Training helps employees become more efficient in their tasks, reducing downtime, minimizing waste, and optimizing manufacturing processes.
  • Technology: Manufacturing is becoming increasingly technology-driven. Training equips employees with the skills to operate and maintain advanced machinery and systems.
  • Productivity: Engaged workers tend to be more productive, contributing to increased output and profitability for the manufacturing company.
  • Compliance: Manufacturing is subject to various regulations and industry standards. Training ensures that employees understand and comply with these requirements, avoiding legal and regulatory issues.

Effective training programs are designed to align with the organization’s goals and objectives, ensuring that the workforce is well-prepared and capable of contributing to the success of the manufacturing operations.

In summary, training in manufacturing is a subset of skills development, with a narrower and more specific focus on teaching job-related skills and knowledge. Skills development, on the other hand, is a more comprehensive and ongoing process that aims to develop a well-rounded and adaptable workforce capable of meeting the evolving challenges of the manufacturing industry. Both training and skills development are important for the success of a manufacturing organization, and they often complement each other in the development of a skilled and competent workforce.

How Can Technology Improve Manufacturing Skills Development and Training

Technology can significantly enhance manufacturing skills development and training by making the process more efficient, effective, and accessible. Incorporating these technological advancements into manufacturing skills development and training can lead to a more skilled and adaptable workforce, increased safety, reduced training costs, and improved overall manufacturing efficiency.

For example, technology enables experts to remotely assist and guide trainees through complex tasks. Workers can wear smart glasses or use mobile devices to share live video streams and receive real-time instructions. AI-driven connected worker solutions can assist in creating personalized learning paths for trainees based on the work they do, their progress, and their learning style.

Smart connected worker platforms, Learning Management Systems (LMS), and mobile apps can provide access to a wide range of training materials, including video tutorials, interactive modules, and assessments. These platforms allow workers to learn at their own pace and on their schedule, reducing the need for expensive and time-consuming in-person training.

Augmentir is the world’s leading, smart, connected worker solution using the foundational AI technologies underpinning ChatGPT to enhance manufacturing training, onboarding, and skills development. Leading manufacturing organizations are using our smart, connected worker suit and AI-driven insights to foster environments of continuous learning, and make skills development and training processes more personalized, accessible, and effective.

Schedule a live demo to learn why manufacturing leaders are choosing us to improve the training lifecycle with digital skills management tools, real-time insights, and more.

 

See Augmentir in Action
Get in Touch for a Personalized Demo

Learn how manufacturers combat the manufacturing skilled labor shortage and close skills gaps with an Augmented Connected Workforce (ACWF).

An Augmented Connected Workforce (ACWF) offers manufacturing and other industrial organizations a powerful solution to combat the ever-worsening skilled labor shortage and skills gap. According to a report by Deloitte and the Manufacturing Institute, an estimated 2.1 million manufacturing jobs could go unfilled by 2030 and the cost of those missing jobs could potentially total $1 trillion in 2030 alone.

augmented connected workforce acwf manufacturing

By integrating advanced technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), connected worker platforms, and other emerging solutions manufacturers can enhance the capabilities of their existing workforce and bridge skill gaps. Connected worker tools offer real-time monitoring of your frontline workforce, ensuring seamless operations. Moreover, connectivity enables remote collaboration, allowing experts to assist frontline workers from anywhere in the world. This interconnected ecosystem empowers workers with the tools they need to succeed and attracts new talent by showcasing a commitment to innovation and technology-driven growth.

Through an ACWF, manufacturers can effectively combat the manufacturing skilled labor shortage and close the skills gap while driving productivity, innovation, and remaining competitive. Read more about ACWF in manufacturing below:

Implementing an ACWF in Manufacturing

A critical element of transitioning from a traditional workforce to an Augmented Connected Workforce (ACWF) is implementing and adopting new technologies and processes. Here are a few steps that can help with the adoption of ACWF technologies and smooth transitions in industrial settings:

  • Step 1: Assess Current Processes – Organizations must understand existing workflows and identify areas where AI, connected worker platforms, and other ACWF technology can replace paper-based and manual processes to enhance efficiency and productivity.
  • Step 2: Invest in Technology – Procure  AI-driven analytics platforms, mobile technology, and wearable technology to enable real-time data collection and remote collaboration.
  • Step 3: Training and Onboarding – Provide comprehensive training programs to familiarize workers with new technologies and workflows. Emphasize the importance of safety protocols and data privacy.
  • Step 4: Pilot Programs – Start with small-scale pilot programs to test the effectiveness of the implemented technologies in real-world manufacturing environments. Target high-value use cases that can benefit from a transition from paper to digital.
  • Step 5: Continuous Improvement – Gather feedback from workers and supervisors during pilot programs and adapt implementation initiatives based on their input. Continuously optimize processes and technologies for maximum effectiveness.

By following these steps, manufacturers can smooth the transition from a traditional manufacturing workforce to an ACWF, empowering their frontline workers with improved capabilities, skills, and overall operational excellence.

Supporting Learning in the Flow of Work

Augmented Connected Workforce (ACWF) technologies allow for increased frontline support and for new processes around learning and training to strategically upskill and reskill, reduce time to competency for new workers, and to combat the skilled labor shortage in manufacturing and more. Connected worker tools, such as wearable devices and IoT sensors, enable real-time monitoring of worker performance and environmental conditions, ensuring safety and efficiency on the factory floor.

pyramid of learning

An ACWF also allows for improved workflow learning capabilities giving frontline workers access to expert guidance, remote assistance and collaboration, microlearning, and other learning in the flow of work options regardless of the worker’s location.

ACWF tools further enhance frontline activities through:

  • Digital work instructions and guidance: Smart, connected worker platforms provide digital work instructions, procedures, and visual guidance easily accessible to workers on mobile devices.
  • Digital mentors and training: Some ACWFs incorporate “digital mentors” – GenAI-powered industrial assistants that can provide step-by-step guidance to workers, especially new hires.
  • Knowledge capture and sharing: Connected frontline worker applications capture data and insights from frontline workers, which can then be analyzed by AI software and used to improve processes, update work instructions, and share knowledge across the organization
  • Performance monitoring and feedback: ACWF solutions provide visibility into worker performance, allowing managers to identify areas where additional training or support is needed.

augmented connected workforce in manufacturing

In summary, ACWF initiatives empower frontline workers with the digital tools, knowledge, and support they need to learn and improve their skills directly within their daily workflows, rather than relying solely on formal training programs. This helps close skills gaps and drive continuous improvement.

Future-proofing Manufacturing Operations with an ACWF

Adopting an Augmented Connected Workforce (ACWF) approach centered around augmenting frontline workers with mobile technology, immersive training, collaborative decision-making, and continuous improvement, allows manufacturers to future-proof their operations and gain a sustainable competitive advantage. This concept empowers employees with powerful tools that augment and enhance their capabilities, productivity, and overall business processes by accessing critical information and fostering collaboration

AI-powered software can analyze vast amounts of data to optimize production processes and predict workforce development needs. At the same time, connected frontline worker solutions enable the integration of mobile and wearable technologies and provide real-time data insights, aiding in optimizing factory operations and adapting to evolving industry trends.

For an Augmented Connected Workforce, integrating AI and connected worker technologies serves as a vital strategy for manufacturers navigating the skilled labor crisis. Augmentir encourages organizations to embrace ACWF transformations and expedites adoption through a comprehensive connected worker platform leveraging the combined benefits of connected worker and AI technologies.

With Augmentir, frontline workers can access critical information, real-time data and insights, and expert advice and guidance all in the flow of work preventing lost time and improving both efficiency and productivity. Schedule a live demo to learn more about how an Augmented Connected Workforce future-proofs manufacturing operations and enhances frontline activities.

 

See Augmentir in Action
Get in Touch for a Personalized Demo

Learn the differences between onboarding and training in manufacturing, their benefits, and how to improve them with continuous learning.

Onboarding and training are essential components of integrating new employees into a manufacturing environment. Research by Brandon Hall Group found that organizations with a strong onboarding process improve new hire retention by 82% and productivity by over 70%. Additionally, research from NAM and The Manufacturing Institute has found that manufacturing organizations invest an average of 51.4 hours per employee in training and are increasing overall investment in training by an average of 60% in response to the growing skilled labor crisis.

onboarding vs training in manufacturing

Onboarding and training are two key components of a skilled workforce that, while similar, serve different purposes and cover distinct aspects of the employment process.

Both processes are crucial, as onboarding ensures that employees understand the organization’s broader context, and training ensures that they have the expertise to contribute to the manufacturing processes and meet quality and safety standards.

A successful combination of effective onboarding and comprehensive training can lead to more engaged, skilled, and productive employees in the manufacturing industry. Unfortunately, according to Gallup, only 29% of new hires say they feel fully prepared and supported to excel in their role after their onboarding experience.

Read below to learn more about the differences between onboarding and training in manufacturing, why they are both critical to manufacturing success, the benefits of improving them, and how continuous learning strategies coupled with connected worker solutions can improve both and deliver impressive results.

Breakdown of Onboarding and Training Differences

Onboarding in manufacturing is about orienting new hires to the company as a whole, while training is about equipping them with the specific skills and knowledge needed to perform their job functions effectively. Below a breakdown of the differences between onboarding and training in a manufacturing setting:

Onboarding

  • Purpose: Onboarding integrates a new employee into the organization and its culture. It aims to familiarize employees with the company, its policies and procedures, and their roles within the organization.
  • Focus: Onboarding focuses on introducing employees to the broader aspects of the company, such as its mission, values, and culture, as well as administrative and safety procedures.
  • Duration: Onboarding is typically a short-term process, often lasting a few days, but could extend to a few months in certain manufacturing environments.
  • Components: It may include activities like completing paperwork, understanding company policies, meeting the team, plant/site safety, and familiarizing a new hire with the physical workplace.

Training

  • Purpose: Training in manufacturing is a more specific and in-depth process that imparts the knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to perform the job effectively. It is task-oriented and aimed at ensuring that employees can carry out their roles proficiently.
  • Focus: Training focuses on the technical aspects of the job, safety protocols, equipment operation, quality standards, and other job-specific skills.
  • Duration: Training is an ongoing process and may vary in duration depending on the complexity of the role and the employee’s experience level.
  • Components: Training tends to include hands-on instruction, demonstrations, practice exercises, and assessments to ensure that employees gain the necessary skills and knowledge.
Pro Tip

Both initial onboarding and ongoing training can be implemented with mobile learning solutions that leverage connected worker technology and AI to provide workers with bite-sized, on-demand training modules that they can access on smartphones or tablets. These modules can be developed with customized learning paths that are focused on the type of tasks and work employees are doing on the factory floor.

A

Why are training and onboarding important to manufacturing success

Onboarding and training are crucial to manufacturing success for several reasons including safety, compliance, quality, and more. A well-trained manufacturing workforce that has a deep understanding of company policies, its mission, and overall values drives successful initiatives by producing quality products, complying with both industry-wide and company-specific standards, and meeting production goals in a manner that is both safe and efficient.

The manufacturing industry is subject to numerous regulations related to safety, environmental practices, and product quality. Proper training ensures that employees are aware of and adhere to these regulations, reducing the risk of compliance violations and a well-structured onboarding program leads to lower turnover rates and a more effective and cohesive workforce, ultimately contributing to manufacturing success.

In summary, these two tools are essential in manufacturing for setting the stage for employee success and overall organizational success. Onboarding aligns new employees with the company’s culture, policies, and expectations, enhances their safety awareness, and fosters engagement and productivity, while training plays a pivotal role in contributing to manufacturing success by equipping employees with the knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to perform their roles effectively.

What are the benefits of improving training and onboarding in manufacturing

Improving manufacturing employee onboarding and training offers several advantages, benefiting both the company and its employees. Comprehensive onboarding makes new hires feel connected to the company’s culture and values, while ongoing training can offer growth and development opportunities, leading to increased employee engagement and job satisfaction.

Companies with a skilled, well-trained workforce are more competitive in the marketplace, as they can produce higher-quality products at a lower cost and adapt to industry changes more effectively.

Training and development opportunities are often cited as a key factor in employee satisfaction. When employees feel that their skills are being enhanced and their careers are advancing, they are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs.

How continuous learning and connected worker solutions improve training and onboarding in manufacturing

Continuous learning and connected worker solutions can significantly enhance training and onboarding in manufacturing by providing more dynamic, effective, and adaptable approaches.

By incorporating continuous learning and connected worker solutions into the these processes, manufacturing companies can create more efficient, engaging, and rewarding experiences for employees. This not only accelerates the integration of new employees but also supports ongoing skill development and knowledge retention once on the job, ultimately improving productivity and the overall success of the organization.

connected worker as part of connected enterprise

Augmentir’s AI-based connected worker solution is being leveraged by manufacturing leaders to deliver continuous learning and development tools to optimize onboarding training for a rapidly changing and diverse workforce. Our innovative, smart connected worker suite is transforming how manufacturing organizations hire, onboard, train, and deliver on-the-job guidance and support.

 

digital skills management in a paperless factory

Schedule a live demo today to learn how our smart, connected worker solutions, AI-driven insights, and digital skills management are optimizing training and onboarding programs, tracking individual and team progress, and delivering targeted training and upskilling.

 

See Augmentir in Action
Get in Touch for a Personalized Demo

Learn how to apply everboarding in manufacturing, and how it is replacing traditional onboarding and training methods.

According to Brandon Hall Group research, investment in employee training and development programs to enhance skills and knowledge is the highest-rated initiative globally to improve the employee experience. One highly effective approach towards revolutionizing training and onboarding is a continuous learning method called everboarding.

applying everboarding in manufacturing

Everboarding is a modernized approach toward employee onboarding and training that recognizes learning as a continuous and ongoing process. Its foundational characteristic is the belief that learning doesn’t stop after the initial onboarding period. Instead, everboarding emphasizes continuous skill development and employee knowledge enhancement throughout their careers.

Applying everboarding in a manufacturing environment involves tailoring continuous learning and development approaches to the unique needs and challenges of factory floor operations. As industrial processes evolve, employees must be routinely educated on process improvements, new technologies, safety standards, and efficiency initiatives.

Read on to learn more about how to apply everboarding to the factory floor and how fostering a culture of continuous improvement and learning keeps frontline workers safe, efficient, and engaged:

Steps for Implementing Everboarding in Manufacturing Operations

Everboarding in the context of the manufacturing industry refers to a forward-looking approach that ensures employees remain well-trained, adaptable, and aligned with industry standards throughout their tenure. This is essential in dynamic and fast-paced industrial environments like manufacturing. Here are some steps and strategies to begin implementing everboarding in your operations:

  1. Operationalize Learning: Develop and maintain a systematic approach to training and workforce development and ensure that ongoing training and development are available for all shop floor workers.
  2. Develop Learning Pathways: Create clear learning pathways and career development plans for employees. These pathways should outline the skills and knowledge required for career advancement within the manufacturing shop floor.
  3. Implement Digital Learning Platforms: Leverage digital learning platforms and smart, connected solutions to provide employees with access to training materials, videos, courses, and other resources. These platforms can track progress, and employees can learn at their own pace.
  4. Integrate Learning into the Workflow: Using digital, mobile, and connected technologies, organizations can integrate training into the factory floor for moment-of-need guidance and microlearning that allows frontline workers to stay compliant and operations to continue smoothly.
  5. Provide Feedback and Improvement Loops: Create a feedback mechanism where employees can provide suggestions for improving training programs and processes. Make sure to act on the feedback to continuously enhance the training experience.
  6. Initiate Regular Skill Assessments: Implement regular assessments and evaluations to identify areas where employees need further training or improvement.

Everboarding in a manufacturing factory floor environment is critical for keeping the workforce skilled, adaptable, and able to meet changing demands and technological advancements. By fostering a culture of continuous learning and improvement, you can ensure that the factory floor remains efficient and productive.

5 Useful Everboarding Technologies

Implementing Everboarding in manufacturing requires the use of various technologies to facilitate continuous learning and skill development. Here are five (5) useful technologies that can help speed the adoption of everboarding methods on the factory floor and support frontline workers on their continuous learning paths.

  1. Learning Management Systems (LMS): LMS platforms are essential for delivering and managing training content. They allow manufacturing companies to organize courses, track employee progress, and ensure compliance with training requirements.
  2. Connected Worker Applications: Connected worker applications provide mobile solutions, real-time data, and actionable insights that enable customized and personalized training dedicated to the needs of individual workers and specific tasks.
  3. Artificial Intelligence (AI): AI-driven systems can personalize training content based on employee performance and preferences. AI’s ability to process vast amounts of data, provide personalized experiences, and offer real-time feedback makes it a powerful tool for implementing everboarding.
  4. Internet of Things (IoT): IoT sensors can be integrated into manufacturing equipment to gather data on machine performance and employee interactions. This data can inform training needs and help identify areas for improvement.
  5. Wearable Technology: Wearable devices can be used for on-the-job training and performance monitoring. They are especially useful in high-risk manufacturing environments.

These technologies leverage connectivity, digital tools, and data to create a more dynamic and adaptive learning environment for frontline employees. By integrating emerging technologies like smart, connected worker solutions into manufacturing operations, companies can create a more agile and adaptive learning environment that supports the foundations of everboarding.

Pro Tip

Digital training tools can help implement everboarding and improve learning speed and retention. For example, workers who need visuals or real-world scenarios can access them using AI-powered software to create a comprehensive everboarding and training program that supports frontline employees throughout the entire skills and training lifecycle.

A

Improving Manufacturing Training with Everboarding

Implementing new learning technologies in any industry is met with a certain number of challenges. This remains especially true for the factory floor where training and development are traditionally separate from the work being done, and where traditional onboarding has been a one-and-done type of approach.

However, because everboarding is a process of continuous learning, organizations can improve their industrial training and onboarding, ensuring employees continually acquire new skills and knowledge to adapt to evolving technologies and processes. This not only helps in training new employees but also enables continuous learning and skill development for the entire workforce, improving productivity, safety, and quality in the process.

Implementing everboarding in factory floor operations can seem complex but it is a rewarding process that can be streamlined through solutions like Augmentir’s connected worker solution. With our AI-driven insights, our connected solution reduces onboarding time and transforms workforce training, bringing learning to the factory floor through intelligent guidance that delivers information to workers at the point of need.

Learn how manufacturers are implementing Augmentir’s AI-driven connected worker tools to capture and digitize tribal knowledge, reskill and upskill their workers, and empower their frontline teams – schedule a live demo today.

 

See Augmentir in Action
Get in Touch for a Personalized Demo

Learn how continuous and workflow learning can help modernize employee training in the manufacturing industry.

Staying ahead of the curve in today’s manufacturing marketplace means that businesses need to innovate and adapt. To accomplish this, organizations must have a skilled workforce and ongoing training and workforce management processes to support continuous learning and development.

Modernizing training cultivates employee skillsets by implementing continuous learning in the flow of work.

modernize manufacturing training with continuous learning

Continuous learning is the process of attaining new skills on a constant basis. Workflow learning involves educating yourself on the job using resources and self-directed learning materials. Done together, this modern training approach can help streamline productivity.

If you want to learn how to improve manufacturing training with continuous learning and workflow learning, explore this article that answers the following:

What is continuous learning?

Continuous learning in manufacturing involves enabling workers to learn new skills regularly. It’s a great way to improve employee performance and innovation. According to Forbes, embracing a culture of continuous learning can help organizations adapt to market demands, foster innovation, as well as attract and retain top talent.

Learning can come in different forms, from formal course training to hands-on experience. Employees are encouraged to be self-starters who want to evolve their skills on an on-going basis. A good example of a continuous learning model is everboarding; everboarding is a modern approach toward employee onboarding and training that shifts away from the traditional “one-and-done” onboarding model and recognizes learning as an ongoing process.

How can continuous learning be used in manufacturing?

When businesses don’t support continuous learning, manufacturing processes stagnate. This contributes to a lack of innovation and hinders potential opportunities for success that a company may experience.

In a nutshell, the more workers know and the more they can accomplish, the more they can contribute to business growth. This may consist of employees taking an online course or learning a new technique hands-on, no matter what department they’re in.

For example, assembly line workers may learn new manufacturing processes to ensure everything is functioning properly. Meanwhile, operators may study the latest machinery to learn new tricks of the trade.

What is workflow learning?

Workflow training in manufacturing involves learning while doing. This means that workers pick up new skills while on the job through hands-on experience.

The key to workflow learning is that it happens while employees perform their everyday tasks.

Many workers in the manufacturing industry work in shift-based environments, making it difficult for them to attend traditional classroom-based training sessions. With workflow learning, organizations can incorporate more learning processes into the everyday workday of frontline workers – essentially bridging the gap between knowing and doing. This “active learning” aligns with the Pyramid of Learning visual model that illustrates the different stages of learning and their relative effectiveness.

pyramid of learning

Active learning involves the learner actively engaging with the material, often through problem-solving, discussion, or application of the knowledge while they are on the job.

In general, active learning is considered more effective than passive learning in promoting deep understanding and retention of information. Therefore, learning leaders often strive to design learning experiences that involve higher levels of active learning, moving beyond the lower levels of the pyramid and promoting critical thinking, creativity, and problem-solving skills.

How can workflow learning be used in manufacturing?

Workflow learning consists of using resources at your disposal to complete tasks. This strategy is sometimes referred to as performance support.

For example, workers can look up answers to questions, steps of a process, or new services while performing their jobs instead of interrupting their workflow to go to a class or training session.

Pro Tip

Active, or workflow learning can be implemented with mobile learning solutions that leverage connected worker technology and AI to provide workers with bite-sized, on-demand training modules that they can access on smartphones or tablets. These modules can be developed with customized learning paths that are focused on the type of tasks and work employees are doing on the factory floor.

A

How can technology improve manufacturing training?

The nature of manufacturing training is changing in the age of artificial intelligence. Today, many training processes can be streamlined and optimized using digital and smart, connected worker technologies.

For instance, data collected from everyday manufacturing processes can polish training programs online. Experienced workers can share best practices on customized dashboards for other employees to access. These can be updated in real-time and show changes highlighted to better optimize manufacturing processes.

Digital training tools can also help improve learning speed and retention. For example, workers who need visuals or real-world scenarios can assess them using AI-powered software to maximize their training.

 

Augmentir is the world’s leading AI-powered connected worker solution that helps industrial companies optimize the safety, quality, and productivity of the industrial frontline workforce. Contact us for a live demo, and learn why leading manufacturers are choosing us to elevate their manufacturing operations to the next level.

 

See Augmentir in Action
Get in Touch for a Personalized Demo

Watch Augmentir’s presentation at Learning & HR Tech 2024 and see how Generative AI Copilots transform learning and development in manufacturing.

Generative AI in learning and development has started to shape the future of HR across the board including attracting, developing, engaging, and retaining talent.

AI has revolutionized how organizations approach:

  • Talent acquisition – for smarter recruiting
  • Talent development – for skills analysis and performance evaluations
  • Worker relations – capitalizing on its ability to personalize employee relations
  • Workforce planning – leveraging its ability to make sense of data to perform more accurate forecasting and capacity planning
  • People analytics – using AI to make sense of employee data from an engagement and skills optimization standpoint
  • Performance management – relying on it for benchmarking and progress evaluation
  • HR operations – leveraging AI’s ability to automate and support onboarding and offboarding processes
  • Learning and development – using AI in everything from content creation to delivering personalized and adaptive content

generative ai learning copilots

However, Generative AI in learning and development has yet to make a significant impact on employees where it matters the most – in the flow of work.

This is where Generative AI learning copilots and AI-powered connected worker solutions come in. Together these technologies are transforming learning for frontline workers, improving onboarding, enabling learning in the flow of work, and driving more efficient upskilling and reskilling.

Watch our full presentation from Learning and HR Tech 2024 “Generative AI Learning Copilots: Transforming Learning as We Know It”, on-demand below.

Key Highlights:

  • Generative AI in learning and development has started to shape the future of HR across the board including attracting, developing, engaging, and retaining talent.
  • Deskless workers make up 80% of all workers globally and are underserved from a learning and development perspective, with 78% feeling they don’t have the right amount of training to succeed.
  • Generative AI Learning Copilots can generate training content, translate languages, provide real-time feedback, give on-demand guidance and answers, and serve as a digital performance support tool.

Generative AI Learning Copilots for Deskless Workers

Deskless workers, often referred to as “frontline workers”, generally do not sit in front of a desk and make up about 80% of all workers globally, they are on the front lines – in factories, at retail counters, construction sites, hospitals, and more.

While frontline workers and activities have undergone dramatic changes over the past few years, they are still woefully underserved from a learning and development standpoint.

  • 78% of frontline workers feel they don’t have the right amount of training to succeed at work
  • 65% want information on-demand and “in the flow of work”
  • Only 12% of HR operations leaders are actually satisfied with their L&D processes in support of their frontline employees

The reality is that traditional onboarding and training practices have been proven to be ineffective, however, much like AI has historically been used to improve the efficiency and output of machines, we can do the same with our frontline workforce.

AI learning and development tools and GenAI assistants can help:

  • Identify areas for content improvement, and implement those improvements
  • Measure training effectiveness
  • Create personalized, job-relevant training and curriculums
  • Measure and improve workforce effectiveness

Managing Manufacturing Workforce Challenges with GenAI Learning Copilots

The workforce crisis in manufacturing is accelerating and at the forefront of the minds of operations and HR leaders.

In fact, even if every skilled worker in America were employed, there would still be 35% more unfilled job openings in the manufacturing sector than skilled workers capable of filling them. Deloitte predicts that the skilled labor crisis will cost manufacturers upwards of $1 trillion by 2030.

In 2019, the average tenure in manufacturing was 20 years, the average time in position was 7 years, and the average 90-day retention rate was 90%. As of 2023, however, the average tenure is 3 years, the average time in position is 9 months, and the average 90-day retention rate was 50%.

These are representative of drastically different manufacturing realities. The workforce of 2019 is not coming back, and neither will productivity, unless organizations make significant investments and strides in supporting frontline workers with the appropriate tools and training. Luckily, smart connected worker and generative AI technologies offer a path forward.

Generative AI helps manufacturers answer:

  • What is the skills inventory of the team that is in attendance today?
  • Who can/should perform this work?
  • Who would benefit the most from targeted training?
  • Where should they focus on for process improvement?
  • What type of training would give them the biggest return?
  • What training materials need Improvement?

Generative AI-powered copilots and digital assistants can take this further, allowing frontline manufacturing workers access to vast amounts of knowledge in the flow of work when they need it most, helping to predict and prevent skills gaps before they impact production, and to design efficient and personalized development curriculums to shorten the time it takes for workers to be effective and competent in their positions.

Interested in learning more?

If you’d like to learn more about Augmentir and see how our AI-powered connected worker platform improves onboarding, training, skills management, and other learning and development aspects across organizations, schedule a demo with one of our product experts.

 

See Augmentir in Action
Get in Touch for a Personalized Demo

Learn about performance management in manufacturing, best practices and implementation methods, and key examples and use cases.

Manufacturing performance management is the process of setting, monitoring, and optimizing key performance indicators (KPIs) related to production processes and workforce performance in manufacturing environments. It includes real-time monitoring and evaluation of employees’ work, as well as the continuous improvement of operational workflows to ensure optimal efficiency, product quality, and adherence to both safety requirements and organizational goals.

performance management in manufacturing best practices

Through data-driven insights, performance management software, and regular assessments, performance management aims to enhance employee productivity, reduce downtime, and maintain a competitive edge in the industry. Read our blog post below to learn more about performance management in manufacturing including:

5 Best Practices for Performance Management in Manufacturing

To get the best value from your performance management system here are five best practices for performance management in manufacturing:

1. Clear Goal Alignment:

Organizations must ensure that performance management processes align with overall organizational goals. They must clearly communicate objectives to employees at all levels, linking individual and team performance metrics to broader manufacturing and business objectives. This fosters a sense of purpose in frontline teams, engages workers, and helps employees understand how their efforts contribute to the company’s success.

2. Real-time Monitoring and Data Analytics:

Implement real-time monitoring of production and shop floor processes and equipment performance through the use of AI and connected worker technology. Utilize data analytics and AI-driven processing to gain insights into worker performance trends, identify bottlenecks, and facilitate data-driven decision-making. The ability to monitor operations in real-time not only enables proactive interventions to maintain efficiency, it also ensures fairness, accuracy, and transparency in performance measurement.

Pro Tip

Performance management software in manufacturing is crucial for optimizing production efficiency, and should integrate with other manufacturing systems, such as Learning Management Systems (LMS), Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), and Manufacturing Execution Systems (MES), to provide a holistic view of the entire manufacturing operation.

A

3. Employee Training and Development Programs:

Prioritize ongoing training and development programs for manufacturing personnel. Equip frontline workers with the necessary skills to adapt to evolving technologies and operational requirements. Use performance management systems and other digital tools like skills matrixes to identify skill gaps, set training goals, and track progress, ensuring a skilled and adaptable workforce.

4. Regular Performance Reviews and Feedback:

Conduct regular performance reviews that provide constructive and timely feedback to employees. Use these reviews as opportunities to recognize achievements, address areas for improvement, and set new performance goals. Foster open communication between managers and employees to encourage continuous improvement.

5. Integration with Continuous Improvement Initiatives:

Integrate performance management systems with “kaizen” or continuous improvement initiatives such as Lean or Six Sigma. Use data from performance metrics to identify opportunities for process optimization, waste reduction, and efficiency improvements. This ensures that performance management is not only evaluative but actively contributes to the ongoing enhancement of manufacturing processes.

Leveraging these best practices contributes to a holistic performance management process that aligns manufacturing organizations and their frontline workforce with strategic goals, optimizes operations, and creates a culture of continuous improvement.

Key Performance Management Strategies for Manufacturing Leaders

The following are a few examples of performance management strategies that manufacturing leaders, plant managers, and shift supervisors should consider when implementing their performance management process.

Line-shift Goals

Manufacturers often use production planning and scheduling systems to manage line shifts effectively and ensure a smooth transition between different production configurations. While line shifts in manufacturing are often necessary for adapting to changing demands, introducing new products, or optimizing efficiency, they can also pose challenges, including downtime, quality control issues, employee fatigue, and planning issues. By establishing clear and measurable objectives for each line shift or individual worker that aligns with organizational goals, production leaders can ensure production goals are met.

Individual Meetings and Communication

Manufacturing leaders should implement a performance management strategy that incorporates 1-1 meetings and communication. Regularly providing constructive feedback to employees on their performance can improve performance and boost employee engagement. Offering coaching and development opportunities to enhance skills and capabilities.

Continuous Training

Continuous training in manufacturing involves enabling workers to learn new skills regularly. It’s a great way to improve employee performance and innovation, as well as engage and retain top talent. A good example of a continuous learning model is everboarding, a modern approach toward employee onboarding and training that shifts away from the traditional “one-and-done” onboarding model and recognizes learning as an ongoing process.

Performance Management Tools

Implementing performance management tools can help automate ongoing employee evaluation, as well as align employee performance with other key manufacturing KPIs, including production quality, machine uptime, and labor utilization. These tools can also be used to identify continuous improvement opportunities. This allows manufacturing leaders to adapt and refine approaches based on feedback and outcomes.

Simplifying Performance Management with Digital Tools

According to Forbes, as the future of work evolves and changes so must performance management, traditional methods may no longer be as successful in an era where the workforce is constantly changing.

Digital tools such as connected worker solutions and AI-driven analytics help simplify performance management systems by streamlining processes, improving efficiency, and providing more accurate insights. Implementing these connected worker solutions automates the collection of performance-related data from various sources including connected frontline workers, IoT devices, software systems, and more. This eliminates the need for manual data entry, reducing errors and ensuring real-time access to up-to-date information.

By digitizing the performance management process, organizations create a centralized platform for storing and managing performance-related data. This centralized knowledge base makes it easy for managers and employees to access relevant information, track progress, and collaborate on performance goals. Furthermore, AI-driven connected worker solutions allow for digital performance tracking, customized training and skills development planning, workflow optimization, and improved predictive maintenance.

digital skills management in a paperless factory

Through these digital tools and technology, manufacturing companies can simplify performance management processes, improve operational efficiency, and adapt to the demands of a rapidly evolving industry while fostering a culture of continuous improvement and development for their manufacturing workforce.

Augmentir is the world’s leading connected worker solution, combining smart connected worker and AI technologies to drive continuous improvement and enhance performance management initiatives in manufacturing.

Augmentir is trusted by manufacturing leaders as a digital transformation partner improving training and development, workforce allocation, and operational excellence through our AI-driven True Productivity™ and True Performance™ offerings, as well as digitizing and optimizing complex workflows, skills tracking, and more through our patented smart, connected worker suite. Schedule a live demo today to learn more.

 

See Augmentir in Action
Get in Touch for a Personalized Demo

AI-powered technology may be the missing puzzle piece for today’s workforce crisis.

AI-powered technology may be the missing puzzle piece for today’s workforce crisis in manufacturing.

Is it just us or does recruiting, training, and retaining top talent today feel a lot like searching for that one elusive puzzle piece? The seismic shift in the workforce is forcing us to get creative and be adaptable like never before.  It’s a new generation and if we want to be competitive in hiring in this ultra-competitive environment, we need to re-access how we train, develop, and retain talent, embrace the variable nature of the labor market, and meet workers where they are. 

We can no longer try to force-fit the old model of staffing and training into a space that looks drastically different. It’s not just about a labor shortage or the supply chain challenges created by the pandemic. Workers themselves are changing. What they want from work, and how they want to work.

The solution to this head-scratching puzzle? AI-based technology. Digital work instructions and individualized training and on-the-job support can improve productivity, reliability, independence, and safety for every worker. It offers flexibility in scheduling for operations managers. It reduces downtime. All of which contribute to a more efficient – and profitable – operation.

Sound too good to be true? Brace yourselves. It’s not. Here are three ways that AI-powered technology can help.

1. Moving onboarding and training closer to the point of work

Imagine if we could train and develop someone in the context of doing their work, leading to increased engagement and allowing organizations to retain top talent. Furthermore, we could see an increase in productivity as they constantly evolve their learnings.

AI is allowing companies to understand a worker’s skillset and provides the ability for personalized digital work instructions to guide them in the context of work while they are doing their job, whether it’s a new worker or one with dozens of years of experience. With an AI-based onboarding approach, organizations are able to hire a wider range of individuals with varying skill sets and get those individuals productive faster.

2. Give support at the moment of need

Are you a people watcher? We are. Ever take notice of who is on the factory floor? Last time I checked, we got the “newbies” and “veterans”. The variability of the workforce, both skilled and young, proves that there’s not a one size fits all approach to troubleshooting and performance support.

Enter AI.

Give workers the support and guidance they need, at the moment of need, whether it’s immediate access to a digital troubleshooting guide, or connecting virtually with a subject matter expert.  Delivering personalized work procedures for every worker allows for continuous learning and growth.

3. Improve engagement and retention

Workers that are connected and empowered with digital technology can discover and nurture diverse skills based on their unique competencies and experience. They can earn greater responsibility and independence. This increases confidence and job satisfaction. Which in turn can improve employee retention and slow the revolving door of continual recruiting and training. 

The aftermath?

Workers are likely to stay and want to grow in the company when they feel included. Shortly, workers begin walking with poise and a “can-do” attitude to their next job task.

 

What else is possible with AI-powered connected worker technology?

AI-based technology is ideal for training workers in this variable environment. AI-based systems individualize information about workers based on previous training and data-driven performance insights and augments their capabilities. It offers step-by-step guidance at the moment of need for regularly scheduled maintenance as well as troubleshooting. It helps managers learn about workers’ existing skills and build a rationale for specific roles, resources, and certification support and then make clear recommendations based on demands.

Technology should fit into your business as simply as sliding that last puzzle piece into place. Workers are the heart of your business, and you should adapt technology to fit your business, not the other way around.

Technology should fit into your business as simply as sliding that last puzzle piece into place. That includes how you train your workers. But no two workers are exactly alike. Each will learn and approach problems differently. So why not use the technology that recognizes and adapts to those differences to your advantage?

 

To learn more about how Augmentir can help you embrace this opportunity, contact us for a personalized demo.